Sunday Sounds: Lichtweg/Lightway by Jennifer Jolley

Composer Jennifer Jolley is a relatively new voice to the wind ensemble and one we all should know. Her work Lichtweg serves as a great introduction to her work.

The library of works for the wind ensemble is growing. Sure, that statement seems a bit obvious as new composers are writing for this performance medium, but it is not just achieving new numbers. Our repertoire is gaining quality works from composers, both established and new. This may largely be due to the willingness of conductors to interact and communicate with composers.

Certainly, technology helps. It is much easier to send records back and forth nowadays, as well as connect via text message or FaceTime. And, conductors are capable of sharing ideas with others regularly. That is how I discovered composer Jennifer Jolley.  In talking with a friend and conductor of a collegiate ensemble, I asked what they were programming this semester. The reply was filled with great standard works and one which I was not familiar. It was Lichtweg (Lightway) by Ms. Jolley.

Currently, Jennifer Jolley is Assistant Professor of Music at Ohio Wesleyan University where she teaches composition and music theory. She holds degrees from the University of Southern California (B.M) and the University of Cincinnati (M.M. and D.M.A.). Ms. Jolley’s teachers include Stephen Hartke, Frank Ticheli, Michael Fiday, Joel Hoffman, and Douglas Knehans.

While her catalog is diverse, her works for wind ensemble are a bit more recent. Motordom was composed in 2009, and is a musical interpretation of American light-artist Keith Sonnier’s light installation in Los Angeles. Her next work for winds, Through the Looking Glass Falls, was completed in 2014. The next four compositions were published in 2016 and 2017.

About Lichtweg

Jennifer Jolley was commissioned by the Georgia Tech Concert Band with Lichtweg being the result of the process. The ensemble premiered the work on November 19, 2017.

Like Motordom, Jolley drew inspiration from another of Keith Sonnier’s installations. This time, it was the exhibit in Terminal 1 of the Munich Airport in Germany. Photos of the installation can be found on Sonnier’s website, and are linked here. The exhibit uses glowing neon lights and mirrors throughout the corridor. The idea is to help passengers direction and variety, helping them relax from the stress of travel.

As for the composition, Jolley states the following in the program notes:

In this piece I musically portray the rhythmic placement of red and blue light emanating from this neon installation by creating a constant eighth-note ostinato that is heard throughout the piece. Just as the panes of glass, mirrors, and aluminum sheets refract and scatter the colorful neon light, this ostinato is diffused amongst the different colors in the ensemble.

The ostinato used can make the work a bit more challenging than it appears. Often times, a couple groups of musicians perform the ostinato but are separated by an eighth note, providing reflection like the mirrors in the installation. Even with the rhythmic challenges, the composition is filled with bright energy. Jolley uses the timbres of the ensemble to show the variety of light and color in the exhibit.

Her website includes a midi recording of the work, though with several ensembles performing it recently, I would not be surprised if she added a live version. There is also a sample of the score is included on her site. This work, and others, are available for rental.

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