The Ensemble Director’s Snow Day Survival Guide

They are the most exciting and terrifying words for teachers across the nation: Snow Day. Here is how you can make the most of the missed time.

We are in the midst of a nationwide epidemic. Snow and ice forced thousands of school districts to close their doors in the name of safety for students and teachers. One snow day is okay, but some districts are already calling off school for the rest of the week. After missing Friday last week and two days this week, my kids are ready to go back to school.

I am ready for them to go back as well.

All classes suffer from the missed time, but music classes can argue being hurt the most. The lack of consistent rehearsals can lead to performance concerns in tone, pitch, and musical retention. While we cannot do anything about students leaving instruments at school, we can make sure we are prepared for what comes next.

Snow Day Survival Guide

  1. Pour a cup of coffee, hot tea, or your favorite beverage.
  2. Relax. Breathe. Read something. Stay away from your iPhone, iPad, and all things internet until lunch. And no NetFlix. That stuff is addictive.
  3. After an hour or so, take out your baton and metronome.
  4. Set your metronome to a tempo of 68 with a triplet subdivision. Begin conducting various patterns (four bars of 4, then 3, back to 4, then 5, etc.) with the right hand only.
  5. Repeat #4, adding a little staccato flick (check mark, flicking something off your baton).
  6. With same metronome settings, move left hand only. Start in resting position then move up 4 counts, down 4, right 4, back center 4, left 4, back to center 4. Then do this at 3 counts, 2 counts, and 5 counts. Be sure to breathe.
  7. Take out your scores, baton, metronome, and notebook.
  8. Read through your score from a large view, looking for musical content (dynamics, articulation, tempo changes, etc.) and make notes.
  9. With your metronome going, conduct the piece without stopping.
  10. Repeat steps #7 & 8 for each score.

There you have it. It is simple, but it prepares your mind and body for the next rehearsal. Avoid listening to the pieces. And do this list without focusing on rehearsal planning. Yes, take time to plan for the next rehearsal (whenever it may be), but preparing your mind and body for full runs of works is needed.

How often do you really run the full piece? I know when it comes to marching band, directors will end rehearsal with a full run of everything. Concert groups not so much. Doing full mental runs of a piece will help you build continuity as your ensemble rehearses. We get caught up in the minutia that we fail to build and teach larger musical concepts.

Take the time during your snow day to mentally and physically prepare for your performance. It will lead to more efficient rehearsals moving forward.

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