Marching Band: Electronics can hurt your performance

The use of electronics in marching band is nothing new, but can do more harm than good. Here are some things to consider when using this resource.

Drum Corps International wrapped up its season last night with World Class Finals. As fans watched around the world, one thing became clear: electronics in marching band are here to stay.

Okay. Maybe that is nothing new, but the use of electronics with an ensemble is always risky. The potential for problems is immense. The power could go out. A channel on the board could blow, or a speak could malfunction. Someone may not have replaced the batteries, or put them in backwards. Wind or rain may keep electronics from working properly.

Just ask Carolina Crown, who’s vocalist’s microphone kept going out on them in finals.

Now, I am not one of those grumpy fans that believes electronics should not be used. It is a great tool, given that it is used appropriately. Just like playing an instrument or tossing a rifle, electronics can add to your performance. As a matter of fact, it was Bluecoats program “Tilt” that sold me on the resource. The incorporations of pitch bends between powerful chords was stunning.

However, I do have some issues that should be addressed.

The List

It is unfortunate that the following statement must be uttered. Before you incorporate electronics, ask yourself if it is necessary. Then, ask someone else in the know. Be sure to discuss how you are going to use the resources you have available. Sometimes, just saying no can change the entire show. And make it better.

As an adjudicator, there were shows in which I had to mention speaker placement causing the ensemble’s sound to be overpowered. The speakers were pointed right at the center of the pressbox. Directors and ensemble staff must understand the range and spread each speaker provides and place them in a more appropriate manner. Personally, spacing them further way from the center of the field is better. But that is just my experience with the equipment available.

Yes. Feel free to use microphones to amplify soloist or to add sound effects. However, if you are going to amplify your best players in each section to bulk-up the entire ensemble’s sound, please don’t. What message is that sending to your ensemble?

Of course, then you require someone to sit in the stands with an iPad to manipulate the soundboard. How is that allowed? We can’t go on the field and tell that super-hero baritone to back off, so why can you control the volume on a sound board?

We can get into the argument of availability to all ensembles and the like, but each ensemble makes choices based on what they have on hand or can get. If you have electronics, use them wisely. Sure, there are great reasons for them. Adding microphones to the front ensemble has expanded the instruments performed exponentially. That is a good thing! Voices overs can be great, but also distract from the performance of the ensemble. Maybe not talking during a color guard feature will draw more attention to them?

Again, I am not saying do not use electronics in marching band. Rather, use them wisely. And verify everything is in full working order prior to performance.  Make sure it is a necessary part of your program, not simply to cover up the weak in the name of a trophy.

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