Friend-raise before you fundraise

Cheese and sausage. Fruit, especially oranges. Cheesecakes. Car Washes. Concessions at athletic events. Magazines. Craft festivals. What do all of these things have in common? They are fund-raisers that every band director has either done or considered. We know these events are required in order to supplement the programs in which we work, but how successful are they in reality?

We have also stated our desire to see more people attend concerts or other music department events. We can advertise, send letters home, sell tickets, and drag people off the street but these numbers will not improve until we can do one thing effectively:

Friend-raise: Build relationships with people in our communities by showing support for them WITHOUT asking for anything in return.

Show genuine support of other programs

This can be a slippery slope, but one I feel we must traverse. If we want to have access to the football field for a rehearsal or if we do not want to see a kicker on the field during halftime, we must build a mutual respect for athletic teams and officials. As an avid sports fan, this has never been difficult for me. I love to chat with coaches about strategy, player attitudes, and recruiting. But, in order to get an audience with coaches, I showed support for them.

One day during band camp, I will take the band over to the football team’s practice and play a few songs for them. Before a big away game, students would volunteer to perform as a pep band as the team got on the bus. Many times, alumni donors and university officials would see the action and come talk to the students and show support. Those alumni would often donate money to the marching band and the University President to the overall music program.

The issue with this is that you may get asked to do more. What I have found, however, is that I had more room to decline because I was already doing more than expected.

J Corey Francis, Indiana State University
Butler University and Indiana State University performing together on Sept. 11, 2011.

Be visible to the community

When the community has something going on, be involved. Ask the leaders of a 5k or 10k race in your community if you can place groups of students towards the end of the course to play participants across the line. The students can cheer the runners on when no playing music. One group I worked with even sang “Happy Birthday” to “that guy” as he passed by (they did not know his name, but he said it was his birthday).

Being visible does not only mean playing. If there as a food bank in your community, challenge other band programs in your area in a contest to see which group can raise the most. Then, deliver the food as a group. Or, volunteer to help deliver Thanksgiving meals to those in need. Find a day that students can help serve at a shelter for those in need or animals.

Sure, all of this sounds planned and self-serving, but I honestly believe the students will learn life-long lessons through this type of service when genuine.

Publicize activities constantly

We all have iPhones or the Samsung Galaxy (or some sort of smart phone…). Taking pictures of your students at any event in which they participate and sending them to the local paper can show the community that you are more than a marching band.

Find ways to show all the extra things your students do well through pictures. Cheering on the football team? Take a picture! Playing at the nursing home? Take a picture! Auditioning for college, or performing in solo and ensemble, or working with an amazing instructor in a master class? Take a picture! Then, with permission of the parents and school, send them to the newspaper or post them on website or social media for the community to see.

Once you have spent time showing the your town that the ensemble is part of their community, they will support you and your students. This does not happen over night, but slow, thoughtful, and genuine work will bring results. Just like practicing. Get to know your community, and your community will get to know you.

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